KOMMONSENTSJANE – MEXICO IS THE NEW SUGAR DADDY FOR OREO’S

How US Sugar Policies Just Helped America Lose 600 Jobs.  They will make the cookies in Mexico; but, the cookies will not be the same.  Mexico’s sugar is not as sweet as the sugar in the U.S.  Their sweets are half as sweet as the U.S.  Just blame Obama for this.  It is a continuation of his deliberate loss of jobs to get us on our knees.  You can’t work if you have to pray five time a day.

Boxes of Mondelez International's Oreo Cookies in multiple yummy flavors on a supermarket shelf in New York on Tuesday, March 9, 2015. Pershing Square Capital Management has invested $5.5 billion in the company, 7.5 percent stake. Mondelez International owns the Oreo, Cadbury and Trident brands. (© Richard B. Levine)

Boxes of Mondelez International’s Oreo Cookies in multiple yummy flavors on a supermarket shelf in New York on Tuesday, March 9, 2015. Pershing Square Capital Management has invested $5.5 billion in the company, 7.5 percent stake. Mondelez International owns the Oreo, Cadbury and Trident brands. (© Richard B. Levine)

Bryan Riley

August 18, 2015

Bryan Riley is a full-time advocate for free trade through his research and writing for The Heritage Foundation. He brings years of experience in trade and economic issues to his role as Jay Van Andel senior analyst in trade policy. Read his research.
The manufacturer of Oreo cookies recently announced plans to move production of Oreos from Chicago to Mexico, resulting in a loss of 600 U.S. jobs.

This should be a wake-up call to defenders of the U.S. sugar program and other job-destroying trade barriers.

The leading ingredient in Oreos is sugar, and U.S. trade barriers currently require Americans to pay twice the average world prices for sugar.

Sugar-using industries now have a big incentive to relocate from the United States to countries where access to their primary ingredient is not restricted.

If the government wants people making Oreo cookies and similar products to keep their jobs, a logical starting point would be to eliminate the U.S. sugar program, including barriers to imported sugar.

This obvious connection between the lost jobs and sugar quotas was missed by many observers. According to one online commenter: “This is why tariff[s] on products coming to U.S must be raised.”

That’s backwards. When protectionist policies like the U.S. sugar program lead to offshoring, the response shouldn’t be to pass new laws to discourage such offshoring or to raise tariffs even higher. The response should be to eliminate government policies that encourage offshoring in the first place.

The loss of Oreo cookie jobs should reinforce a lesson on the job-destroying aspect of protectionist trade policies.

According to a 2006 report from the government’s International Trade Administration: “Chicago, one of the largest U.S. cities for confectionery manufacturing, has lost nearly one-third of its SCP manufacturing jobs over the last 13 years. These losses are attributed, in part, to high U.S. sugar prices.”

That lesson appears to be lost on unions that are supposed to represent the workers losing their jobs in Chicago.

For example, The Bakery, Confectionery, Tobacco Workers and Grain Millers Union consistently has opposed free trade agreements with sugar-producing countries like Australia, Brazil, and Mexico—the kind of trade deals that just might protect their members’ jobs.

So that’s how the cookie crumbles.

kommonsentsjane

About kommonsentsjane

Enjoys sports and all kinds of music, especially dance music. Playing the keyboard and piano are favorites. Family and friends are very important.
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